One of the modern medical explanations of yoga: the fascia is the body's largest sensory organ - FANS SPORTS

One of the modern medical explanations of yoga: the fascia is the body's largest sensory organ

Anyone who has practiced yoga for years may have wondered: Why does a bizarre set of stretching exercises make you feel so happy and relaxed? Ask your teacher, who will tell you that it is because you have gained energy during the practice. And then I'll tell you something about the "energy body" and the "subtle body." The more you talk, the more incomprehensible it becomes. Then the teacher also admitted: in fact, he did not understand, but he can feel. And this theory was taught to the teacher by his guru, originally from the Vedic scriptures.

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Ok, say replenish energy what have no wrong, but eat also is replenish energy, why eat meal instead after meeting drowsy? There's a lot of talk about "energy" or "qi" in yoga circles these days, but these concepts are too big to explain the science behind the practice.

As a surgeon with a modern medical education, I decided to explore the principles behind yoga in terms of modern anatomy and neurophysiology. After a year of reading a lot of literature and accumulating some experience from the basic forms, I think I can describe this mechanism roughly. However, there are too many knowledge points involved to cover in a single article, so I have written a series. It's an extension and elaboration of the article I wrote in early 2020 called why Yoga is Neurofeedback training.

Since we're talking about neurofeedback, the first thing we need to talk about is where the input signal comes from. For example, we hold our breath and hold our nose when we smell a bad smell. This is because the smell stimulates our central nervous system through the smell receptors, which in turn generates a series of neural commands to hold our breath and hold our nose to direct our limbs to perform these feedback actions. Yoga also stimulates the mechanoreceptors in the fascia, our body's largest sensory system, producing tension, proprioceptive and pain signals that feed into our central nervous system and activate the feedback effect.

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